Drexel Code Review

As far as binary option auto traders go, the number of scams and/or fakes is mind boggling to say the least. It is disheartening, sad and infuriating at the same time. Disheartening to new traders who held the belief that, with their lack of experience, auto trading was their only hope of making it in binary options. Sad to all of us who have lost money, or know someone who lost money, to these scams and above all, infuriating because despite all the public outcry, there is no regulatory authority in place to control these conmen on the loose. Because of that, they continue lying to unsuspecting traders who naively entrust them with their money, hard earned or not, only to later cry foul when, instead of expanding, their bank accounts suddenly contract to a point where all the zeros in the balance disappear to leave only one zero. Because of the con artists, who are very many by the way, the greater population has developed apathy towards binary options in general, meaning less business for the legit auto traders.

We believe that binary options trading offer great potential and that it is profitable. We feel bad when a few rotten apples give the industry a bad name which is why we devote our time to exposing frauds and acknowledging the real deals. On this one, we take on Drexel Code, a controversial auto trader sharing a name with an equally controversial college. You can bet all your money that no punches were pulled. Enjoy the read, and (maybe) learn something from it all.

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Drexel Code Review

Well, we get it. Drexel Code sounds more like a physics concept than a trading software and for most, it may sound like something out of Drexel College. That aside, Drexel Code is an automatic trading algorithm created and presented by a grumpy man, probably in the wrong side of half a century, with some serious grey hair, more grey than the dark grey sweater he’s wearing. The man says his name is Cory Graves, expert trader, programmer and financial analyst. From our experience, that is a most likely front, to cover up his real identity (hey, nobody likes jail). And he has good reason to do so as, from what we found out about him, and his alleged market-beating software, the old chap deserves to be ‘picking up soap’ in a run-down federal prison. Now to unmasking the software in question, shall we?

According to Drexel Code site, which by the way is not safe for browsing according to Google Chrome, Drexel Code is an auto trader that is programmed in such a way that each registered trader is guaranteed, breath in and out then read this slowly – more $344k every single month. Simply put, Drexel Code will make you a millionaire in just under three months! Something that your 9 to 5 job, which you acquired after spending some additional years in college getting a masters after realizing everyone has a bachelor’s these days, has failed to achieve for 5 years. Imagine that. Just between you and us, when the pressures of life (taxes, bills and more bills!) get to us, we visit some auto trading sites and there’s never a dull moment. Like, $300k a month? Somebody call the editor of Forbes!

What more, Cory Drexel claims that within the three years the software has been in operation, it has never lost a single trade. Simply put, the damn thing has an accuracy of 100%, which is absolutely commendable, until you find out that only Cory Drexel says that. Apart from the fact that everyone who’s ever traded with Drexel Code is coming out to say that the software is the worst they’ve ever seen, or heard, or read for that matter, we know that no auto trader in the world can be that accurate. In fact, not even a single auto trader is 90% accurate. The top industry accuracy level is somewhere around 87%-89%. We find it funny that only Cory Drexel holds that Drexel Code gets the job done. Everyone else who has tried, and even market experts (including our team) thinks otherwise.

Deconstructing the Code

The first thing we noted when we landed on Drexelcode.com was the sheer lack of organization and style exhibited by the site’s developers. We combed the whole site, including the often overrated FAQ section and didn’t learn anything new. Everything said on the site is pure fabrication and fantasy thinking from a deluded old man who should be somewhere teaching his grandchildren how to wipe their little noses. The reason we say this is because we didn’t see any evidence to prove that anything said in the page was true. We for one wanted to know how Drexel Code can make more than $300k for a single person in a month. We even sent several emails to the provided support email asking for further information on the same. Grandpa’ and his team could only reply with a generic promotional message asking us to register and become rich, just like our favorite Hollywood actors. First, does the (stupid) person(s) manning the support’s email even know the difference between an enquiry and an expression of interest?

We didn’t want to know what Drexel Code can make for us, or depending on who you ask and how you do it, take away from us, all we wanted to find out what is what exactly the so called ‘code’ was and how it guarantees 100% winning chances in every trade. Filling people’s inboxes with uncalled for self promotion material is the worst form of marketing and it gets even worse if the person was simply asking for clarification and not some long self promotion essay written in lower grade English.

drexel code

drexel code main page

In our investigations, we came to know that we’re not the only ones who have some reservations when it comes to Drexel Code. Most of the comments we read online about the system were all negative with the same storyline – naive person stumbles across the site, sees everything written on it, watches the sales pitch video, signs up, deposits some money and logs off, hoping to come back to a bigger bank account only to find all the money they invested vanished in thin air.

We don’t even need to be told, it was clear to us that Drexel Code was a scam from the very first time we visited the site. The headline that greeted us, ‘Easy $340k every month!’ was the first giveaway. Hell, even if you’re not an experienced trader (or even a trader) or has never been conned, you can tell that the statement is as far from the truth as Cory Drexel’s hair.

Doctored Screenshots

If you’re a social media user, you know that 2016 is the year of the screenshot, just as much as 2015 was the year of selfies. Relationships have been broken with just a single screenshots and so have many a careers been sabotaged. In many ways, the screenshot is the truth, almost like a CCTV camera but more private. Cory Drexel, and his accomplices tries to use a clearly doctored screenshot to prove a point, which doesn’t even make sense in the first place. The screenshot shows the account balance of a female trader to be $40,000 as at 14th February 2016. According to the accompanying testimonial, the trader had only been trading for less than a month to get to the figure. From far, the screenshot looks believable, especially after going through the accompanying testimonial(s). However, as the wise folks said, it is next to impossible to fool all the people all the time. We were not fooled by the particular screenshot (and several others also on the site) and did some background checks to prove, or disapprove the claims.

This being a screenshot, our options were very limited and the only thing we could do is check the date on the screenshot against the date on which Drexelcode.com was registered. As it turns out, the domain name Drexelcode.com was registered on 4th March this year and the site fully updated a several days later. Thus, the claims of the woman that she had traded with the software for several weeks prior to mid-February are outright lies. Unless, of course Drexel Code already existed before it got a domain registered which is most likely not the case since there’s no mention of that anywhere in the site.

drexel code annoying pop up

drexel code annoying pop up

Drexel Code is a Scam

To be clear, Drexel Code is a scam, and a dangerous one at that. It would be very unfortunate if you get scammed by Cory Drexel and his team after hearing it from us to stay away. For we are not ones to hid behind politically correct statements or beat around the bush, we have to support our statement with facts. Below are the reasons why we don’t trust Drexel Code, and suggest you don’t too:

  1. Perfection? False

Earlier on, we talked about how, according to Cory Drexel, the software hasn’t lost a single trade in over three year period which puts its alleged accuracy at 100%. To deconstruct the claims, we have already established that Drexel Code only came to be in March 2016, which is not even a year ago, let alone 3 years. Two, Drexel Code is not, and can never be, 100% accurate. Not only Drexel Code but also any other trading system. This is because binary options are a very unpredictable and extremely risky venture. As such, there’s no single person, or algorithm in this case, that can predict price movements with absolute certainly. To make matters worse, Cory Drexel does not explain how the system accomplishes that and/or the particular strategy it uses. And even if he did, we would still fault him because, no matter which calendar you’re using, from March to now cannot be three years. Have we mentioned how all the traders we talked to complained of constant losses when using Drexel Code? This is despite Cory Drexel, with a straight face no less, looked into our eyes and said that the software has never, and cannot make a loss.

  1. Cory Drexel doesn’t exist

One of our verification procedures when confronted with such a system is to unearth the identity of the alleged developer and collect as much information as possible to be able to come to a reasonable conclusion. And we did our due diligence, as usual. We searched through several social platforms for a man, any man, called Cory Drexel and we might as well not have bothered because our search amounted to nothing. Zero. But then again, that was not a surprise since everything we had read, and watched on the sales video told us that Drexel Code was a fraud. We didn’t expect the man who came up with the idea to be reached and neither did we expect him to give his real name and risk legal suits.

  1. Countdown widget

In case you haven’t visited the site yet, and we suggest that you don’t, there is a countdown widget that apparently counts the number of beta testing slots available (it is always beta testers who are required). This number starts up high when you enter the site and continuously decreases until it gets to one. Apparently, you have to sign up before the time indicated is over, otherwise you miss a lifetime opportunity to become rich. Let us just say that it is not the first time we’ve come across such and we devised a way to prove that everything you see is a lie. Basically, when you clear your cache and refresh your browser, the countdown will start again at a higher figure and not at 1. This shows that the whole idea of countdowns is deceptive and is meant to pressure traders to hastily creating accounts with these shady sites.

Drexel Code Review Conclusion

To conclude, there’s nothing more to say about Drexel Code and its creator other than, keep off at all costs. But don’t worry though, we found a software that actually works and that delivers on its promises. Options Robot passed all our tests and is far ahead of the others we have tested and therefore, if you are looking for a legit, accurate and profitable auto trader, you know where to look.

Exclusive offer! Get the binary option robot for free by clicking on the button below!

Michael Allen

Michael Allen is the main author at www.binaryoptionrobotinfo.com. He holds a PhD in Economics and has worked in investment banking for 24 years.